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Tuesday, November 17, 2020 | History

3 edition of Biological control of Hemlock woolly adelgid in the eastern United States found in the catalog.

Biological control of Hemlock woolly adelgid in the eastern United States

Mark S. McClure

Biological control of Hemlock woolly adelgid in the eastern United States

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  • 35 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team in Morgantown, WV .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hemlock woolly adelgid -- Biological control -- East (U.S.),
  • Tsuga -- Diseases and pests -- Biological control -- East (U.S.)

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesTechnology transfer biological control.
    StatementMark McClure.
    SeriesFHTET -- 2000-08., FHTET (Series) -- 2000-08.
    ContributionsUnited States. Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination10 p. :
    Number of Pages10
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17619997M
    OCLC/WorldCa51954459

    Native to Asia, the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) is a small, aphidlike insect that threatens the health and sustainability of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) and Carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana) in the Eastern United States. Hemlock woolly adelgid was fi rst reported in the Eastern United States in near Richmond, Virginia. control agent of hemlock woolly adelgid (Homoptera:Adelgidae) in Japan. Environmental Entomolo gy McClure, M. S. Managing hemlock woolly adelgid in ornamental landscapes. Bulletin Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. 7 p. McClure, M. S. Biological control of hemlock woolly adelgid in the eastern United States. Hemlock Woolly Adelgid. Greg Wiltsie. December 2, Prepared for US Forest Service and Pennsylvania DCNR. This report will discuss the history of the hemlock woolly adelgid and the problems that are caused when this insect infects the eastern hemlock trees in the eastern portion of the United States.


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Biological control of Hemlock woolly adelgid in the eastern United States by Mark S. McClure Download PDF EPUB FB2

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Biological Control Hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (HWA) (Fig.1) is native to Asia and western North America. HWA was first discovered in the eastern United States (U.S.) in near Richmond, VA. It is believed to have originated in southern Japan and introduced on nursery stock.

This publication covers the distribution, biology, damage, and biological control of hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) and is a substantial revision of Biological control of Hemlock woolly adelgid in the eastern United States book, Biological control of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in the Eastern United States, by Mark McClure, Acknowledgments Thanks to Chuck Benedict (ITX, Ft.

Collins, Colorado.) for editing. Biological control for hemlock woolly adelgid was discussed with state-employed forest health specialists in the six states where L. nigrinus was released. The personal interactions provided the cooperators' information for management decisions about the control of hemlock woolly adelgid in each state.

Publications. The hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) (Adelges tsugae Annand) (Figure 1) is a destructive, non-native pest of forest and ornamental hemlock trees in eastern North America. As a member of the Adelgidae, it shares many characteristics with its relatives, the true aphids (Aphididae) and phylloxerans (Phyl-File Size: KB.

Hemlock woolly adelgid was first collected from hemlock in the eastern United States in near Richmond, V irginia. The pathway and source of the introduction are. The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid is a native species in Asia. Populations are found in the Pacific NW of the USA and Canada, where its population is thought to be controlled by a combination of natural enemies and host resistance.

development of biological control for hemlock woolly adelgid. We would also like to thank the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, Northeastern Area, Region 8, and Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team, for providing funding for the preparation and printing of this Size: 6MB.

The hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae, a tiny sap-sucking insect related to aphids, is causing widespread death and decline of hemlock trees in the eastern United k trees are ecologically important, strongly influencing the types of animals, other organisms, and environmental conditions present in the areas where they grow.

Get this from a library. Biological control of Hemlock woolly adelgid in the eastern United States. [Mark S McClure; United States. Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team.]. Pseudoscymnus tsugae for biological control of the hemlock woolly adelgid in suburban setting, pp.

In: B. Onken, R. Reardon, and J. Lashomb (eds.). Proceedings: Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in the Eastern United States Symposium, February, East Brunswick, New Jersey. USDA Forest Service and New Jersey Agricultural Experiment. The hemlock wooly adelgid was first found on ornamental eastern hemlock in in Richmond, Virginia, but was not considered a serious pest because it was easily controlled with pesticides.

HWA became a pest of concern in the late s as it spread into natural stands. It now threatens the entire hemlock population of the eastern United States.

Biological studies and evaluation of Scymnus coniferarum Crotch, a predator of hemlock woolly adelgid from western North America Molly Norton Darr ABSTRACT (ACADEMIC) The hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA), Adelges tsugae Annand, is an invasive pest of eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carriere and Carolina hemlock Tsuga caroliniana Englem.

in the eastern. Hemlock Woolly Adelgid. The hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae (HWA), a tiny sap-sucking insect related to aphids, is causing widespread death and decline of hemlock trees in the eastern United States. This species, native to Asia and the Pacific Northwest, was first noted in the eastern United States in in a park in Richmond, VA.

And after a limited (and very expensive) chemical intervention on a handful of trees inI began looking carefully at the research literature on hemlock woolly adelgid control, searching for a way to implement biological control of HWA for our entire acre property.

Here is a review of some important research on biological control of HWA. Biological control is a simple numbers game, which in this case involves a Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Adelges tsugae) organism accidentally introduced from Southern Japan – and its native predator beetle from southern Japan Sasajiscymnus tsugae (St) which was intentionally introduced by USDA for HWA control purposes.

St predators respond to a. Biological control of Hemlock woolly adelgid in the eastern United States Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team. Biological control of Hemlock woolly adelgid in the eastern United Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team. Biological control of Hemlock woolly adelgid in the eastern United States [microform.

Biological Control of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid: What is it Going to Take to Make it Work?; in United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service. Forest Health Technology Enterprise Team.

FHTET Brad Onken and Richard Reardon, Compilers. Fourth Symposium on Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in the Eastern United States. Hartford, Connecticut. 2 22 Abstract 23 Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemlock Woolly Adelgid) is a small piercing-sucking insect that 24 feeds on hemlock trees (Tsuga spp.).Native to Asia and the Pacific Northwest, the Hemlock 25 Woolly Adelgid is invasive in the eastern United States where it attacks Tsuga canadensis 26 (Eastern Hemlock) and T.

caroliniana (Carolina Hemlock). It is currently found. The hemlock woolly adelgid, or HWA, is an invasive, aphid-like insect HWA was introduced to the western United States in the s.

It was first observed in the eastern US in near Richmond, long-term solution of biological control agents. As research continues on the effectiveness of natural enemies to controlFile Size: KB.

HWA appeared in the western United States in Experts believe that the adelgid was brought to North America on imported ornamental hemlocks. In the west, the adelgid is found on mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana) and western hemlock. Origin Hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae, is an invasive insect in eastern North evidence suggests that the invasive eastern U.S.

population came from Japan and not the western United States, where the species feeds on western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla [Raf.]Sarg.) but is believed to be native and is not a pest.

Biological control of invasive plants in the eastern United States / Other Title "This book is a substantial revision of FHTET, Biological control of hemlock woolly adelgid"--Pref. Includes bibliographical references and index. Date: ; Book/Printed Material A weed risk assessment system for new conservation weeds.

In book: Proceedings: Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in the Eastern United States Symposium, Chapter: Pseudoscymnus tsugae for biological control of. Hemlock woolly adelgid has now spread to cover 50% of the geographic range of eastern hemlock.

In the past 20 years, this invasive pest has left most of the trees it has enountered either dead or in a highly weakened state. Sincethe major emphasis for addressing the problem has been investment into biological control.

Chapter 1: Biological Control Agents. Sasajiscymnus Lady Beetle from Japan-- Carole Cheah; Scymnus Lady Beetles from China-- Michael E. Montgomery; Laricobius Derodontid Beetle from British Columbia-- Scott Salom; Pathogens-- Bruce L. Parker, Scott Costa, Margaret Skinner; Chapter 2: Outlook.

References. Hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA), Adelges tsugae (Annand), remains the single greatest threat to the health and sustainability of hemlock as a forest resource in the eastern United States.

It is an exotic pest native to Asia and western North America. First discovered in the eastern United States in near Richmond, VA, the pathway and source of the.

DEC and Cornell Launch New Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Biological Control Laboratory Economists estimate that invasive species cost the United States more than $ billion in damages every year. The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid is threatening trees in nearly half of the state's counties and, consequently, this new effort to control and stop its.

OCLC Number: Notes: "Biological control"--Cover. "December "--Cover. Shipping list no.: P. "This book is a substantial revision of FHTET, Biological control of hemlock woolly adelgid"--Preface.

tsugae on target prey (the hemlock woolly adelgid) on hemlock twigs in cages in rearing facilities in the eastern United States (Conway et al., ); adults oviposited on gauze as often as hemlock twigs, at least when adult females are confined inside l glass jars.

This study demonstrates the feasibility of using nonplant material as. Hemlock woolly adelgid > Biological control > East (U.S.) Eastern hemlock > Diseases and pests > United States. Tsuga > Diseases and pests. Hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) is a non-native, invasive pest infesting eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) and Carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana).

First reported in the s, HWA has spread to the southern Appalachian region in the early s. Without control, hemlock trees die within 5 to 7 years after infestation. "This book is a substantial revision of FHTET, Biological control of hemlock woolly adelgid"--Pref.

Includes bibliographical references and index. Subject headings Hemlock woolly adelgid--Biological control--East (U.S.) Eastern hemlock--Diseases and pests--United States. Tsuga--Diseases and pests.

Hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) is a serious pest of Eastern (Tsuga canadensis) and Carolina (Tsuga caroliniana) hemlocks of all sizes. Native to Asia, HWA was first discovered in North America in British Columbia in HWA was first reported in the eastern United States in near Richmond, Virginia.

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) is another non-native forest pest that is threatening North America's hemlock trees. Mark Whitmore, forest entomologist at Cornell University, explains what this pest. Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Biological Controls Join Rangers in Great Smoky Mountains National Park as they release biocontrol beetles.

The beetle, a species called Laricobius nigrinus, is a predator of the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, an invasive insect from Asia that has wreaked havoc on many hemlock forests in the eastern United States. The hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) Adelges tsugae was first described in western North America in and first reported in the eastern United States in near Richmond, VA.

Research scientists using molecular genetics have recently determined that several distinct populations of HWA occur in Asia and western North America and we now know that HWA populations found. Native to Asia, the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae), or HWA, is a small, aphid-like insect that threatens the health and sustainability of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) and Carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana) in the Eastern United States.

HWA is the single greatest threat to hemlock health and sustainability in the eastern U.S. The $ million lab, partially funded by DEC with monies from the State’s Environmental Protection Fund and headed by Cornell entomologist Mark Whitmore, is expected to be dedicated to researching and rearing biological controls to stop the spread of the invasive pest Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA), which is threatening trees in about half of.

Hemlock woolly adelgid was reported in the eastern United States in the late s in southeastern Pennsylvania. It now occurs in at least seven eastern states and the District of Columbia (Figure 2). The origin of this infestation is unknown.

However, this same insect has been present for more than half a century in the PacificFile Size: KB. Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Uh-dell-jid) (HWA) is an introduced, aphid-like insect from Asia that attacks eastern hemlock.

As ofeighteen states from Maine to Georgia have HWA. Many areas infested with HWA display extensive tree decline and mortality.

hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. HWA is a non-native insect pest that is quickly decimating hemlocks in the eastern United States. Since the s HWA has spread north from Virginia to Maine and as far .This tiny aphid-like insect originated in Asia and was detected in the western United States in the s and later in the eastern United States in the s.

The hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) attacks and kills both eastern and Carolina hemlocks, the only two hemlock species native to North Carolina. The hemlocks usually die within a few.HEMLOCK WOOLLY ADELGID INTERIOR STATE QUARANTINE June 5, WHEREAS, the Director of the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, having found that a dangerous pest commonly known as hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand, is injurious to native eastern hemlock, has become established in parts of the eastern and.